Breaking News in the Industry: May 17, 2016

Attorney: Diamond Diva Jewelry Store Robbery was Not ‘Crime of Violence’

Brandishing a gun, tying up store clerks with zip ties and getting away with millions of dollars worth of jewelry was not a “crime of violence” according to Abigail Kemp’s defense attorney. Kemp, an aspiring model dubbed the “Diamond Diva,” is accused of conspiring with three men to rob a string of jewelry stores across the Southeast. She allegedly trained for months before stealing over $4million worth of jewels in a series of armed robberies on jewelers across five states – Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Tennessee. In a new motion her attorney, Michelle Daffin, argued that two of the four counts against her should be dropped writing that the charges don’t meet the definition of “crime of violence.” “An offense can categorically qualify as a crime of violence only if all of the criminal conduct covered by the statute, including the most innocent conduct, meets the crime of violence definition.” Kemp faces 20 years in jail if convicted. Court documents show she was in and out of police custody since she was 19 years old, arrested seven times for underage drinking, drugs, and battery. The FBI believes Kemp and her boyfriend and alleged accomplice Lewis Jones were acting on behalf of a bigger gang with the stolen gems even being sent abroad… [My Panhandle]

 

Be Vigilant about Cybersecurity, Warns Former FBI Agent

Former FBI special agent and cybercrime expert Chris Tarbell, who once was called the “Eliot Ness of online crime” by Newsweek, provided cybersecurity tips to an audience at the AICPA spring Council meeting Sunday in New Orleans. During an interview before Council, he said individuals and organizations need to make sure they and their organizations don’t become easy marks for hackers. He said it’s not necessary for everyone in an organization to have expertise about firewall settings in routers. But he said everyone can educate themselves on prevention and be vigilant for signs of cyber breaches. Here are some of his tips for improving cybersecurity.

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  • Combat insider threats: Insider threats are not limited to employees with malicious intent. Employees who just don’t know any better may introduce malware by inserting thumb drives from home into a system or clicking on malicious links in emails.
  • Compartmentalize: Having different networks for different functions can protect organizations in the same way by preventing an intruder from getting access to all sensitive files.
  • Consider log files: When a system is hacked, log files allow management to look back and figure out where the hacker went, what access they achieved, and whether they are still in the system. Manage passwords and patches: Choosing strong passwords and storing them in a safe place is essential for security
  • Learn from others: News reports today often include information about the latest breach suffered by a high-profile organization. But those news reports may also include details about how a hacker operated. Paying attention can help you recognize your own vulnerabilities.

[Journal of Accountancy]

 

Shoplifter Stealing Steaks, Toilet Paper is Shot by Guard

A man shoplifting steaks and toilet paper was shot by a security guard Sunday after the two got into a fight, police say. The shoplifter is a 21-year-old man who was allegedly stealing the items from a Save-A-Lot store. When the security guard approached the man about his alleged crime, “the altercation turned violent,” police say. At one point, the suspect was on top of the security guard, leading the guard to go for his gun. The guard shot the man once in the shoulder. The suspect then fled the store and ran for help. The injured man was taken to a hospital for treatment. His injuries were not life-threatening… [NBC News]

 

Cargo Thieves Increasingly Using 3D Printing

Security company G4S says criminals are using 3D-printed security devices to disguise cargo thefts. The technology allows thieves to make counterfeit copies of devices such as high security cargo seals and locks/padlocks in as little as 10 minutes, allowing them to hide signs of tampering and make it difficult to identify the location or time of the theft. “For a few hundred dollars, a person can purchase a 3D scanner that eliminates the need to understand computer-aided design and can not only provide the dimensions for any item but also creates the CAD technical specifications needed to produce a near-perfect replica…It is important that companies recognize that this new threat means they need to improve their supply chain security and lower their vulnerability to this emerging threat…” [Securing Industry]

 

LP Worldwide: Armed Robbers Stole £250k of Gems after Claw Hammer Attack on Jewelry Store Staff

A robber has been jailed for ten years after his gang attacked jewellery shop staff with a claw hammer before escaping with £250,000 in gems. A masked gang brutally attacked a member of staff and the female store owner with the hammer in the ‘professionally planned commercial robbery’. An employee was twice hit with the claw hammer and the owner was also struck with the weapon when she pressed a panic alarm. The gang then fled with the jewellery haul. Bradley Devine took part in the terrifying raid at SP and Green Jewellers. Devine, whose role had been to open the door for the gang and who had not been masked, had previously tried unsuccessfully to steal a Rolex from the same shop… [Birmingham Mail]

 

LP Worldwide: Web Credit Card Fraud in Taiwan Totaled $706 Million in 2015

Credit card fraud is clearly on the rise as a worldwide concern. Online credit card fraud has risen 10-fold in Taiwan over the past six years as e-commerce continues to carve out a greater share of domestic retail sales, according to statistics from the National Credit Card Center of R.O.C. (NCCC). Credit card fraud caused losses of NT$820.29 million in 2015, and NT$706 million ($21.61 million US) of that, or 86.7 percent, was online credit card fraud, the NCCC said. That was nearly 10 times more than the NT$73.33 million in losses caused by credit card fraud in 2010. Credit card fraud is not a problem unique to Taiwan, especially as online transactions grown in popularity around the world, but consumers here still should not sacrifice security for the sake of speed and convenience, said NCCC general manager Lin Tung-liang… [The China Post]

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