Tag: rfid technology

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a product identification method that relies on storing and remotely retrieving data using RFID tags. This technology aids primarily in the accountability and identification of product. Unlike UPC bar codes, RFID technology does not require contact or line of sight for communication. This system enables automatic identification of any material object or inventory item without scanning individual labels or tags.

The RFID tags are integrated circuits that include a small antenna, using electromagnetic fields to transfer data. The tagging system includes the tag itself, a read/write device, and a host system application for data collection, processing, and transmission. The RFID reader transmits an encoded radio signal to the tag. The tag receives the message and then responds with its identification and other data. This may simply be a unique tag serial number, or may contain product-related data such as a stock number, lot or batch number, or other specific information. Since tags have individual serial numbers, the RFID system design can discriminate among several tags that might be within the range of the RFID reader and read them simultaneously.

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RFID tags that contain their own power source are known as active tags. An active tag has an on-board battery and periodically transmits its ID signal. Active tags have more memory and can be read at greater ranges. Those without a power source are known as passive tags. A passive tag is cheaper and smaller because it has no battery. This type of tag is briefly activated by the radio frequency scan of the reader. The electrical current is small—generally just enough for transmission of an ID number.

Systems are flexible and adaptable, able to read large amounts of tagged items at once and allowing for various applications. RFID tags can be applied to or incorporated into a product, allowing for various applications. They are typically small enough that they are not easily noticeable and therefore can be placed on many types of objects. This technology is continuing to grow in use and application.


An Update on Major Subjects Affecting Retail LP

An Update on Major Subjects Affecting Retail LP

After completing the three-part series on the first fifteen years of Loss Prevention magazine, I promised to write an additional article that looks at the current and future state of some subjects we discussed that have a huge influence on the retail loss prevention profession. As I looked at the   Read More


A New Chapter in Retail

Following are a few article summaries that can provide you with a small taste of the original content available to you every day through our daily digital offerings, which are offered free through LossPreventionMedia.com. In addition to our daily newsletter, a comprehensive library of original content is available to our   Read More


An RFID Solution for DSW (Nedap)

An RFID Solution for DSW (Nedap)

Footwear retailer DSW is looking at the future—one that doesn’t include dual electronic article surveillance (EAS) technologies. EAS systems utilize one of two signal technologies: radio frequency (RF) or acousto-magnetic (AM). Having both RF and AM EAS systems in most stores, DSW was faced with the challenge of moving forward   Read More


RFID Blocking Wallets: Are They Necessary?

RFID Blocking Wallets: Are They Necessary?

Radio frequency identification (RFID) skimming is a form of digital theft which enables information from RFID-equipped credit cards to be read and duplicated. It can be used as a form of wireless identity theft or credit card theft. Typically, it involves the illegitimate reading of RFID-enabled credit cards (or other   Read More


Use Cases for RFID Inventory Control

Use Cases for RFID Inventory Control

A 2014 survey of 120 major retailers polled by Chain Link Research found improved inventory accuracy, which translated into reduced out-of-stock and better on-floor availability of merchandise, was the number-one reason for implementing an RFID inventory control program.

According to Su Doyle, IoT and RFID industry program lead for Checkpoint, several of   Read More


Senseon Cabinet Locking System Expansion Brings High-End Retailers New Loss Prevention Options

Senseon Cabinet Locking System Expansion Brings High-End Retailers New Loss Prevention Options

New additions to the Senseon Secure Access Control System broaden the ability of this keyless, cabinet-level, electronic locking system to help high-end and consumer electronics retailers both improve loss prevention and enhance the customer experience.

“Designers and operators of retail jewelry, boutique, and consumer electronics stores face a two-pronged dilemma: protecting   Read More


The Year Ahead in LP

These are clearly turbulent times in retail. How people shop is changing—and with it the strategies employed to attract and retain customers. Store technology is changing, offering new opportunities, and ushering in new risks. What does the upheaval mean for loss prevention? What are the primary challenges the industry may   Read More


Test, Do, Learn, and Share

Over the years, enterprise needs for supply-chain asset protection (SCAP) have undergone a transformation from lock-and-key security operations to more integrated supply-chain security and facilitation networks. By taking advantage of the latest technology, this evolution is possible. However, too many organizations look to technology as a cure-all. This leads to   Read More