Tag: crisis leadership


The Fundamentals of Corporate Travel Safety

The Fundamentals of Corporate Travel Safety

Overseas travel, particularly business travel, can be seen as glamorous by the uninitiated. In reality, it can be fraught with risk. For those climbing Mount Everest, risk is part of the experience, but for the average business traveler, danger should not be part of the trip.

It is clear that everybody   Read More


The Crisis Leadership Role in Emergency Preparations

The Crisis Leadership Role in Emergency Preparations

While many crisis events are, by their nature, impossible to predict, the impact they have on retailers can be dramatically curtailed if the organization is prepared and crisis leadership is adequately prepared to manage the resultant disruption.

To be a crisis-prepared retailer, Walgreens relies on, well, preparation. Dave Colen, director of   Read More


Vital Elements of a Crisis Management Plan

Vital Elements of a Crisis Management Plan

Does your company have a crisis management plan? Are roles explicitly defined, responsibilities clearly understood, and protocols outlined for effective crisis response? Who should be contacted, how do we reach them, and how soon should we notify them? Is your organization prepared to effectively manage a crisis situation?

The first step   Read More


Why You Need a Retail Disaster Recovery Plan

Why You Need a Retail Disaster Recovery Plan

Loss prevention team duties don’t stop at preventing theft or managing inventory shrink. As evidenced by some of the major news stories of recent years, tragedies and crises in retail are bound to happen–and LP must meet the challenge. Are you prepared?

retail disaster recovery plan
Loss prevention team duties don't stop at preventing theft or managing inventory shrink. As evidenced by some of the major news stories of recent years, tragedies and crises in retail are bound to happen–and LP must meet the challenge. Are you prepared? [text_ad] The Chipotle Lesson, the Waffle House Index, and similar crisis phenomena are discussed at length in a feature article by Laurence Barton, PhD, in the January-February 2017 issue of LP Magazine. Barton, whose 2008 book, Crisis Leadership Now: A Real-World Guide to Preparing for Threats, Disasters, and Scandal, provides critical crisis management advice for executives, knows what he's talking about. In the article, Barton shares examples, lessons learned from recent crisis events, and practical tips on a retail disaster recovery plan:
It would be wise to assume that your competitors are ahead of you. They likely have fusion centers, not emergency operations centers. They are monitoring what Twitter is saying about your company and the crisis real-time. They know the crime trends in neighborhoods, not regions. They have fortified their fusion efforts to link crisis response to messaging with pre-populated statements and frequently asked questions. From a product recall to an industrial accident to a workplace violence incident, they have prepared beyond their peers. My hope is that you and your company move to that category of best practice sooner rather than later. Before 'it' happens to you.
Read the full article, “See You in Court,” to learn how loss prevention may become "crisis central" in the event of a disaster, or check out the other articles in the January-February 2017 issue of LP Magazine. Not yet subscribed? No problem – register here for free.

The Chipotle Lesson, the Waffle House Index, and similar   Read More


See You in Court

See You in Court

Sure, the headline is meant to grab your attention. But what is more likely is that as a loss prevention leader, your litigation team will eventually send an email request following some tragedy that impacts your company store, distribution center (DC), or regional office. The topic of the email—what did   Read More


Emotional Factors in Crisis Management

Emotional Factors in Crisis Management

We often talk about business continuity in practical, pragmatic terms. But it’s important to remember that when a crisis hits a company, no matter how well prepared that company is, emotions will run high.

A fire at a company location, a violent incident or a weather catastrophe that hits multiple stores   Read More